Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Purr by Katy Perry Perfume

I have to say I'm not normally a fan of celebrity scents (except Dita of course but that's different!) so when I was gifted Katy Perry's Purr perfume I didn't think I'd like it. I expected the perfume to be as sickly sweet as the singer herself but I have to say I'm pleasantly surprised.

The composition of Katy Perry Purr is developed by Firmenich perfumer house, combining top notes of peach, forbidden apple, gardenia and green bamboo with the heart of jasmine, pink freesia and Bulgarian rose and the base of vanilla orchid, creamy sandalwood, white amber, coconut and musk.

I was expecting a sickeningly sweet perfume that smelled like a mixture between lollies and vanilla but whilst the scent is a little sweet it is not overbearing. Purr is a floral fruity scent that is quite musky with a subtle (but not sweet) vanilla scent. I would say that this scent is more suited to an evening scent, it you like me prefer to wear a heavier scent in the evening and a lighter in the daytime. Although Purr is an EDP I have noticed it is not very long lasting.

Whats more the perfume comes in this super cute purple cat bottle which would look fab on any dressing table.

Purr comes in 30, 50 and 100 ml EDP which retail between $35 and $65.

Monday, October 20, 2014

The Bookworm presents: Style Me Vintage - Accessories

Style Me Vintage Accessories is the latest offering in the series by Naomi Thompson and Liz Tregenza. It features a range of accessories from the 1920's to 1980's including hats (and headpieces), shoes, bags, costume jewellery, sunglasses and gloves

This book is much thicker than previous titles in the series and unlike its predecessors it is not sectioned up by decade but rather by accessory type. The book details brands to look out for in each accessory and also has sections highlighting certain designers.There is also helpful sections on where to buy vintage accessories and how to look after then.

The book is filled with stunning photographs of some beautiful vintage accessories and would make a great gift for any lover of vintage.

The next book in the series, Style Me Vintage - Home will be released in March next year and I for one can't wait for this one!

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Dress Like Dita - Week 4: Feminine Florals

This weeks Dress Like Dita outfit continues of the floral theme. This simple summer outfit features a stunning floral dress and a great pink turban for lazy hair days. Dita carries a Dolce & Gabbana ‘Miss Sicily’ bag and wears lime green Louboutins.

Dress Like Dita - Week 4: Feminine Florals

Sunday, October 12, 2014

What Emma Did - 12th October 2014

This week I have been:
♥ Shopping for beach inspired homewares for my beach themed dining room
♥ Playing Knack on the PS4 with the Hubby
♥ Watching Dancing with the Stars and Beauty and the Geek (my reality TV show dirty secrets)
♥ Packing for my Sydney trip tomorrow
♥ Picking up a new fridge for our kitchen 
♥ Getting pampered at Honey Bee Beautiful
♥ Planning to get up to see the sunrise with the Hubby but then sleeping in! 
♥ Cutting my hair after planning to grow it out (at least its all the same length now)

Just a quick note to let you know that I am going down to Sydney next week so won't be blogging at all but I will be back the week after with news of my trip.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Dress Like Dita - Week 3: Yellow Floral

 
This weeks 'Dress Like Dita' post features this fab yellow floral outfit. I'm fairly certain that Dita's dress is probably vintage but you can recreate the look with one of many yellow floral vintage style dresses that are on the market.

Dress Like Dita - Week 3: Yellow Floral

Saturday, October 4, 2014

#RE2014 - Recycle

This months #RE2014 buzzword is Recycle so I will be writing a weekly post around this theme. Not only will I be looking at recycling in the normal sense I will be upcycling items from my wardrobe and thrifted items of clothing to give them a new lease of life. I will also be recycling some of my old posts so that new readers can catch up on some of the old stuff so if there is anything you want to see brought back to the blog please leave a comment below!

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Mothly Muse: Bettie Page

I have been posting monthly muse posts for ages and I just realised that I have never done a muse post about the women who is the epitome of 1950's pinups Bettie Page so this months muse simply had to be Bettie!

Bettie Mae Page was born on 22nd April 1923 to Walter Roy Page and Edna Mae Pirtle. Bettie was the second of 6 siblings and when she was 10 her parents divorced. When Bettie turned 13 her father started to molest her and when he was imprisoned Bettie and her sister were placed in an orphanage.

Bettie was a  good student at Hume-Fogg High School, she was voted "Most Likely to Succeed". On June 6, 1940, Bettie graduated as the salutatorian of her high school class with a scholarship. She enrolled at George Peabody College, with the intention of becoming a teacher. However, the next fall she began studying acting, hoping to become a movie star. At the same time, she got her first job, typing for author Alfred Leland Crabb. Bettie graduated from Peabody with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1944.

In 1943, she married high school classmate Billy Neal in a simple courthouse ceremony shortly before he was drafted into the Navy for World War II. For the next few years, she moved from San Francisco to Nashville to Miami and to Port-au-Prince, Haiti, where she felt a special affinity with the country and its culture. In November 1947, back in the United States, she filed for divorce.

Following her divorce, Bettie worked briefly in San Francisco, and in Haiti. In 1949, she moved to New York City, where she hoped to find work as an actress. In the meantime, she supported herself by working as a secretary. In 1950, while walking along the Coney Island shore, she met Jerry Tibbs, a police officer with an interest in photography. She was a willing model, and Tibbs took pictures of her and put together her first pinup portfolio. It was Tibbs who first suggested to Bettie that she style her hair with bangs in front, to keep light from reflecting off her high forehead when being photographed. Bangs soon became an integral part of her distinctive look.

In late-1940s America, "camera clubs" were formed to circumvent laws restricting the production of nude photos. These clubs existed, ostensibly, to promote artistic photography; but in reality, many were merely fronts for the making of pornography. Bettie entered the field of "glamour photography" as a popular camera club model, working initially with photographer Cass Carr. Her lack of inhibition in posing made her a hit. Her name and image became quickly known in the erotic photography industry; in 1951, her image appeared in men's magazines such as Wink, Titter, Eyefull and Beauty Parade.

From 1952 through 1957, she posed for photographer Irving Klaw for mail-order photographs with pin-up and BDSM themes, making her the first famous bondage model. Klaw also used Bettie in dozens of short, black-and-white 8mm and 16mm "specialty" films, which catered to specific requests from his clientele. These silent featurettes showed women clad in lingerie and high heels, acting out fetishistic scenarios of abduction, domination, and slave-training; bondage, spanking, and elaborate leather costumes and restraints were included periodically. Page alternated between playing a stern dominatrix, and a helpless victim bound hand and foot. Klaw also produced a line of still photos taken during these sessions. Some have become iconic images, such as his highest-selling photo of Page—shown gagged and bound in a web of ropes, from the film Leopard Bikini Bound. Although these "underground" features had the same crude style and clandestine distribution as the pornographic "stag" films of the time, Klaw's all-female films (and still photos) never featured any nudity or explicit sexual content.

In 1953, Page took acting classes at the Herbert Berghof Studio, which led to several roles on stage and television. She appeared on The United States Steel Hour and The Jackie Gleason Show. Her Off-Broadway productions included Time is a Thief and Sunday Costs Five Pesos. Bettie acted and danced in the feature-length burlesque revue film Striporama by Jerald Intrator. She was given a brief speaking role, the only time her voice has been captured on film. She then appeared in two more burlesque films by Irving Klaw (Teaserama and Varietease). These featured exotic dance routines and vignettes by Bettie and well-known striptease artists Lili St. Cyr and Tempest Storm. All three films were mildly risque, but none showed any nudity or overtly sexual content.

In 1954, during one of her annual vacations to Miami, Florida, Bettie met photographers Jan Caldwell, H. W. Hannau and Bunny Yeager. At that time, Bettie was the top pin-up model in New York. Yeager, a former model and aspiring photographer, signed Bettie for a photo session at the now-closed wildlife park Africa USA in Boca Raton, Florida. The Jungle Bettie photographs from this shoot are among her most celebrated. They include nude shots with a pair of cheetahs named Mojah and Mbili. The leopard skin patterned Jungle Girl outfit she wore was made, along with much of her lingerie, by Bettie herself. A large collection of the Yeager photos, and Klaw's, were published in the book Bettie Page Confidential.

After Yeager sent shots of Bettie to Playboy founder Hugh Hefner, he selected one to use as the Playmate of the Month centerfold in the January 1955 issue of the two-year-old magazine. The famous photo shows Bettie, wearing only a Santa hat, kneeling before a Christmas tree holding an ornament and playfully winking at the camera.

In 1955, Bettie won the title "Miss Pinup Girl of the World". She also became known as "The Queen of Curves" and "The Dark Angel". While pin-up and glamour models frequently have careers measured in months, Bettie was in demand for several years, continuing to model until 1957. Although she frequently posed nude, she never appeared in scenes with explicit sexual content.

In 1957, Page gave "expert guidance" to the FBI regarding the production of "flagellation and bondage pictures" in Harlem.

The reasons reported for her departure from modeling vary. Some reports mention the Kefauver Hearings of the United States Senate Special Committee to Investigate Crime in Interstate Commerce (after a young man apparently died during a session of bondage which was rumored to be inspired by bondage images featuring Page). However, the most obvious reason for ending her modeling career and severing all contact with her prior life was her conversion to born-again Christianity while living in Key West, Florida in 1959.

On New Year's Eve 1958, during one of her regular visits to Key West, Florida, Bettie attended a service at what is now the Key West Temple Baptist Church. She found herself drawn to the multiracial environment and started to attend on a regular basis. She would in time attend three bible colleges, including the Bible Institute of Los Angeles, Multnomah School of the Bible in Portland, Oregon and, briefly, a Christian retreat known as "Bibletown", part of the Boca Raton Community Church, Boca Raton, Florida.

During the 1960s, she attempted to become a Christian missionary in Africa, but was rejected for having had a divorce. Over the next few years she worked for various Christian organizations before settling in Nashville in 1963. She worked full-time for Rev. Billy Graham.

She briefly remarried Billy Neal, her first husband, who helped her to gain entrance into missionary work; however, the two divorced again shortly thereafter. She returned to Florida in 1967, and married again, to Harry Lear, but this marriage also ended in divorce in 1972.

She moved to Southern California in 1979. There she had a nervous breakdown and had an altercation with her landlady. The doctors who examined her diagnosed her with acute schizophrenia, and she spent 20 months in a state mental hospital in San Bernardino, California. After a fight with another landlord she was arrested for assault, but was found not guilty by reason of insanity and placed under state supervision for eight years. She was released in 1992.

A cult following was built around her during the 1980s, of which she was unaware. This renewed attention was focused on her pinup and lingerie modeling rather than those depicting sexual fetishes or bondage, and she gained a certain public redemption and popular status as an icon of erotica from a bygone era. This attention also raised the question among her new fans of what happened to her after the 1950s. The 1990s edition of the popular Book of Lists  included Bettie in a list of once-famous celebrities who had seemingly vanished from the public eye.

In 1976, Eros Publishing Co. published A Nostalgic Look at Bettie Page, a mixture of photos from the 1950s. Between 1978 and 1980, Belier Press published four volumes of Betty Page: Private Peeks, reprinting pictures from the private camera club sessions, which reintroduced Bettie to a new but small cult following. In 1983, London Enterprises released In Praise of Bettie Page — A Nostalgic Collector's Item, reprinting camera club photos and an old cat fight photo shoot.

In the 1970s, artists Eric Stanton, Robert Blue and Olivia De Berardinis were among the first to start painting Bettie images. In 1979 artist Robert Blue had a show in LA at a gallery on Melrose “Steps Into Space” where he showed his collection of Bettie Page paintings. At that time in New York artist Olivia De Berardinis had begun painting Bettie for Italian jean manufacturer Fiorucci. Olivia has continued to paint Bettie, culminating in a book collecting this artwork “Bettie Page by Olivia” published by Ozone Productions, Ltd. in 2006, with a foreword by Hugh Hefner.[10] To mark the millennium on an international scale, renowned Japanese artist Hajime Sorayama created original art of Bettie Page style placing her on the pedestal of highly accomplished beautiful women.

By the mid 1980s Olivia would note that women began to frequent her gallery openings sporting Bettie bangs, fetish clothing and tattoos of Page. Olivia said, “Black bangs, seamed stockings and snub nosed 6″ stilettos. These are Bettie Page signatures, anyone who dons them wears her crown. Although the fantasy world of fetish/bondage existed in some form since the beginning time, Bettie is the iconic figurehead of it all. No star of this genre existed before her. Monroe had predecessors, Bettie did not.”

In the early 1980s, comic book artist Dave Stevens based the female love interest of his hero Cliff Secord (alias "The Rocketeer") on Bettie. In 1987, Greg Theakston started a fanzine called The Betty Pages and recounted tales of her life, particularly the camera club days. For the next seven years, the magazine sparked a worldwide interest in Bettie. Women dyed their hair and cut it into bangs in an attempt to emulate the "Dark Angel". The media caught wind of the phenomenon and wrote numerous articles about her, more often than not with Theakston's help. Since almost all of her photos were in the public domain, opportunists launched related products and cashed in on the burgeoning craze.

In a 1993 telephone interview with Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous Bettie told host Robin Leach that she had been unaware of the resurgence of her popularity, stating that she was "penniless and infamous". Entertainment Tonight produced a segment on her. Bettie, who was living in a group home in Los Angeles, was astounded when she saw the E.T. piece, having had no idea that she had suddenly become famous again. Greg Theakston contacted her and extensively interviewed her for The Betty Page Annuals V.2.

Shortly after, Bettie signed with Chicago-based agent James Swanson. Three years later, nearly penniless and failing to receive any royalties, Bettie fired Swanson and signed with Curtis Management Group, a company which also represented the James Dean and Marilyn Monroe estates. She then began collecting payments which ensured her financial security.

After Jim Silke made a large format comic featuring her likeness, Dark Horse Comics published a comic based on her fictional adventures in the 1990s. Eros Comics published several Bettie Page titles, the most popular being the tongue-in-cheek Tor Love Bettie which suggested a romance between Page and wrestler-turned-Ed Wood film actor, Tor Johnson.

The question of what Page did in the obscure years after modeling was answered in part with the publication of an official biography in 1996, Bettie Page: The Life of a Pin-up Legend. That year, Bettie Page granted an exclusive one-on-one TV interview to entertainment reporter Tim Estiloz for a short-lived NBC morning magazine program Real Life to help publicize the book. The interview featured her reminiscing about her career and relating anecdotes about her personal life, as well as photos from her personal collection. At Page's request, her face was not shown. The interview was broadcast only once.

Another biography, The Real Bettie Page: The Truth about the Queen of Pinups written by Richard Foster and published in 1997, told a less happy tale. Foster's book immediately provoked attacks from her fans, including Hefner and Harlan Ellison, as well as a statement from Bettie that it was "full of lies," because they were not pleased that the book revealed a Los Angeles County Sheriff's police report that stated that she suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and, at age 56, had stabbed her elderly landlords on the afternoon of April 19, 1979 in an unprovoked attack during a fit of insanity. However, Steve Brewster, founder of The Bettie Scouts of America fan club, has stated that it is not as unsympathetic as the book's reputation makes it to be. Brewster adds that he also read the chapter about her business dealings with Swanson, and stated that Bettie was pleased with that part of her story.

In 1997, E! True Hollywood Story aired a feature on Page entitled, Bettie Page: From Pinup to Sex Queen.

In a late-1990s interview, Page stated she would not allow any current pictures of her to be shown because of concerns about her weight. However, in 1997, Page changed her mind and agreed to a rare television interview for the aforementioned E! True Hollywood Story/Page special on the condition that the location of the interview and her face not be revealed (she was shown with her face and dress electronically blacked out). In 2003, Page allowed a publicity picture to be taken of her for the August 2003 edition of Playboy. In 2006, the Los Angeles Times ran an article headlined A Golden Age for a Pinup, covering an autographing session at her current publicity company, CMG Worldwide. Once again, she declined to be photographed, saying that she would rather be remembered as she was.

In a 1998 interview with Playboy, she commented on her career:
"I never thought it was shameful. I felt normal. It's just that it was much better than pounding a typewriter eight hours a day, which gets monotonous."

Within the last few years, she had hired a law firm to help her recoup some of the profits being made with her likeness. According to MTV: "Katy Perry's rocker bangs and throwback skimpy jumpers. Madonna's Sex book and fascination with bondage gear. Rihanna's obsession with all things leather, lace and second-skin binding. Uma Thurman in Pulp Fiction. The SuicideGirls Web site. The Pussycat Dolls. The entire career of burlesque dancer Dita Von Teese and Bernie Dexter" would not have been possible without Page.

Bettie Page was hospitalized in critical condition on December 6, 2008 having suffered a heart attack. Her family eventually agreed to discontinue life support, and she died on 11th December 2008. She is buried at Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery. Her headstone lists her name as "Bettie Mae Page" and includes the legend "Queen of Pin-Ups".

In 2011, her estate made the Forbes annual list of top-earning dead celebrities, earning $6 million and tied with the estates of George Harrison and Andy Warhol, at 13th on the list. In 2014, Forbes estimated that Page's estate earned $10 million in 2013.

Quotes:
♥ I don't know what they mean by an icon. I never thought of myself as being that. It seems strange to me. I was just modeling, thinking of as many different poses as possible. I made more money modeling than being a secretary. I had a lot of free time. You could go back to work after an absence of a few months. I couldn't do that as a secretary.

♥ I never kept up with the fashions. I believed in wearing what I thought looked good on me.

♥ I was never one who was squeamish about nudity. I don't believe in being promiscuous about it, but several times I thought of going to a nudist colony.

♥ Sex is a part of love. You shouldn't go around doing it unless you are in love.

♥ I was never the girl next door.

♥ I was not trying to be shocking, or to be a pioneer. I wasn't trying to change society, or to be ahead of my time. I didn't think of myself as liberated, and I don't believe that I did anything important. I was just myself. I didn't know any other way to be, or any other way to live.

♥ Being in the nude isn't a disgrace unless you're being promiscuous about it. After all, when God created Adam and Eve, they were stark naked. And in the Garden of Eden, God was probably naked as a jaybird too!